Writing

Writing in the Second Person - On The Rocks

They say that one of the greatest challenges for a writer is to write in the second person (you) present tense.

I gave it a shot, a short story idea, but haven't completed more than a very short set of introductory paragraphs. The upshot of this story, a confidence man stole your identity. He then stole a sailboat, believing that a) you know how to sail and that b) by stealing your identity he'd acquire your skills also. He was wrong.

Let's join him as he sits on a sinking sailboat, storm tossed, off the coast of nowhere... READ ON

A Review of The Wind-up Girl

Science Fiction set in non-Western cultures can be very interesting, and lately I’ve been lucky to find two that are very immersive, The Wind-Up Girl and Three Body problem. This review will focus on the former.

The Wind-Up Girl (by Paolo Bacigalupi) take place in post-apocalyptic Bangkok. The story is about cultural and character clashes, even among those work towards the same goals. Ths story has been called eco-punk, as it looks at (among other things) the effects of genetically hacked plants, animals and people.

The story involves a power struggle between the Thai government and foreign interests as well as within the government as two ministries vie for power and influence. However, none of the point of view characters are powerful figures in the Thai government, giving that internal struggle less prominence until much later in the story.  READ MORE

TV’s Influence on Science Fiction Novels

This is the story of the frozen protagonist, but it's not fiction.

Over at SFF Chronicles, a British science fiction community website, there’s a writer's topic that’s run hot and cold for a few months now in a couple of different threads: Does a novel’s main character have to change over the course of the story? There’s been a lot of back-and-forth on this, but interestingly, most of those arguing ‘no’ are referencing TV shows as their rationale for why the character shouldn’t change.

So let’s examine that.

Rejection: Living the Writer’s Life

This is the first year that I’ve made an effort to make money from writing fiction. The decision to start trying to create and sell short stories grew from the fact that I’m getting closer to finishing what I hope will be my first published novel. So, the time had come to start acquiring publishing credits (and contacts) through shorter works.

Everyone tells you that it will be hard, and it is. As we near the end of this year, I thought I’d share my experiences, if you're interested.