Curi’i Archive

The Emails as they would look in your inbox:

or read the content here:

Volume 1, Issue 1

1) How Space and Time Could Be a Quantum Error-Correcting Code
The universe may not be a hologram, but our understanding of computer coding may still offer insight to how it functions. Read here.

2) The App as Big Brother
I’ve downloaded and started to read the following paper a few times. It sounds interesting and I feel defeated for not having taken it in yet. Give it a read:
Software of the Oppressed: Reprogramming the Invisible Discipline

3) Cats definitely know their names (and sheep know faces)
It’s pretty much settled science now that cats recognize their names, as if you needed anyone to tell you that. But it turns out that sheep can recognize people from pictures of faces!

4) The impact of drones on the delivery of medical services in remote parts of Africa.
A quote from the article: To date, they have mostly been used in emergency settings to deliver automated external defibrillators and blood, but drones have also delivered vaccines and insulin, among other medical items, where regular supply and stocks are inadequate. The superior aerial view afforded by drones has also proved effective in monitoring mosquito habitats and in spotting victims of drowning.

~ Each issue of the newsletter includes a poem. This issue it was The Cremation of Sam McGee.

Interested in the full experience in your inbox? Never miss a curious link. Subscribe here.

– – – –

Volume 1 Issue 2

1) It’s Called ‘The Cobra Problem’
Here’s something to think about – how will a set condition in your society spur unexpected consequences? There are a few eye-opening examples here for you to contemplate.

2) Anyone Interested in Cybersecurity?
This may be beneath you or old news. For us dabblers, here’s a explanation about SameSite as a means of stopping ‘cross-site request forgery’.

3) Our Definitions of ‘Normal’ Change Over Time
A BBC explainer on forest fires, now verses the past. Is it worse than it used to be?

4) How “OPEN ACCESS” May Actually Hurt Researchers
There’s a movement among scientists to push for open access to all research, that it shouldn’t be kept behind paywalls. This all sounds very noble, but it could be an example of the Cobra Problem mentioned above. Here’s a perspective on why it might not be good for some scientists: Must we decolonise Open Access? Perspectives from Francophone Africa

5) From the files of 007
DARPA wants to build an AI to find what patterns are hidden in the global chaos – who’s pulling the strings, perhaps SPECTRE.

~ Each issue of the newsletter includes a poem. This issue it was An excerpted from 'Child Harold’s Pilgrimage [Canto 3]' by Lord Byron.

Interested in the full experience in your inbox? Never miss a curious link. Subscribe here.