Nurturing the spark (or not)

lightbulb with ideas

I only ever took one creative writing elective in university. The course was supposed to be taught by one professor, a respected author and editor, but she had to pull out, so we got a new guy instead. This professor wasn’t great. Hell, he wasn’t even very good. I couldn’t tell you a single thing he actually taught us. I haven’t retained any lessons learned or insights garnered from that course. Continue reading “Nurturing the spark (or not)”

Books You Hate

stacked books

Have you ever been so disgusted with a book — the story, the editing, the whatever — that you’ve felt the desire to chuck the book against a wall? I have. As a reader, I’m annoyed, dissatisfied. As a writer, it’s an interesting lesson on what can go wrong, and pulls on the fear that maybe I won’t see the problem.

I’ll give you examples, but I’m not going to name names. In both cases, the book was traditionally published, and the author is a respected writer in their genre. Continue reading “Books You Hate”

Walking away from a sale

typewriter

The hardest thing for a new writer to do is to walk away from a sale. I should know, I just did it.

I sent a short story to an anthology. They accepted it. The money offered is not much, but then again, I’m not a ‘name’ writer (yet!). The exposure, or at least having another publication to list, was worth the money.

Then the contract arrived. Continue reading “Walking away from a sale”

Finding blog topics – Star Wars Logo edition

Star Wars early logo

Every writer is told to ‘build a platform’ (get your audience started) before publishing. How do you do that? Well, they’ll tell you to be active on social media and have a blog —

Great, I can do both of those.

— and have fresh content regularly.

Oh. One thing that can be hard to do is come up with topics for a blog. Harder still is finding a topic that someone else hasn’t already done better. Continue reading “Finding blog topics – Star Wars Logo edition”

On Willful Suspension of Disbelief

Black Panther

I just saw Black Panther, and it got me thinking about willful suspension of disbelief. I?ve got no problem with Vibranium, or a hidden African nation that is superior to western nations in all ways. I don?t have a problem with clothing that defies the laws of physics. This is Marvel?s Comic Universe, I?ll suspend my disbelief for these. But there was one thing in this film that tweaked me, pushed me out of the film for just a moment. Continue reading “On Willful Suspension of Disbelief”

Spice World – the seminal Dune story

Dune trilogy covers

Everyone knows Dune (you do, don’t you? If not, why are you here?), and if you’ve even given this blog a cursory glance, you know that lately I’ve been obsessing about Dune more than a little.

I happened to chance onto a book called The Road to Dune in a local second-hand book store (I live in Malaysia. English is not the first language here, so it was a find). Within this book, along with deleted or early draft scenes from Dune and Dune Messiah, was a novella called Spice World. Continue reading “Spice World – the seminal Dune story”

Writers I’ve Known and Their Books

William Kamkwamba is probably the best selling author I?ve known. He was a student at African Leadership Academy back when I was the Communications Manager. He made my live very interesting. His memoir, The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind became a big hit in 2009, leading him to make appearances on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Good Morning America, appearances with Mitch Albom and Tavis Smiley, and many other news programs. Since he was a student at our school, I managed his time vis-a-vis his publicity and his school work, acting as the gatekeeper, often having to refuse requests (sorry, Sky News. One day you?ll forgive me like CNN did.). I don?t know that I learned a lot about the publishing industry from this experience, but I certainly saw the hustle that an author goes through to promote a book, especially a bestseller.

Back in the 1990s, I was the editor of a small weekly entertainment paper called ?Spotlight Magazine.? One of our writers, Michelle McColm, was documenting the process that she went through as an adoptee reuniting with her birth parents. The book is still available on Amazon although I think it?s out of print. Through Michelle, i got to see the author?s journey, specifically the edits and galleys that the publisher sent late in the process for final sign-off. It was invigorating to actually hold those.

More recently I?ve been hanging out (or more often, lurking) in an online community run by Janet Reid, a literary agent. Among the readers of her blog (or ?Reiders?) are a number published or self-published authors.

The community has recently been very excited because long-time contributor Donna Everhart?s first novel, The Education of Dixie Dupree has just been released. It?s been picked by Amazon as a book of the month, and other reviewers are giving it rave reviews. Donna recently recapped much of her journey on her site.

This isn?t the site?s only published writer. A month earlier, Heidi Wessman Kneale published The White Feather. W.R. Gingell seems prolific. Her book Masque has one of the best covers I?ve seen in a self-published book. Another writer, Anne Belov, writes stories about pandas, and has a few books out. Susan Pogorzelski recently published her second book, The Last Letter, about living wiht Lyme disease.

As much as writing happens alone, writers build communities, share experiences and listen to each others? challenges.

Writing in the Second Person – On The Rocks

They say that one of the greatest challenges for a writer is to write in the second person (you) present tense.

I gave it a shot, a short story idea, but haven’t completed more than a very short set of introductory paragraphs. The upshot of this story, a confidence man stole your identity. He then stole a sailboat, believing that a) you know how to sail and that b) by stealing your identity he’d acquire your skills also. He was wrong.

Let’s join him as he sits on a sinking sailboat, storm tossed, off the coast of nowhere…

 

The sound of the surf crashing repeatedly into the shore should have been annoying; it was, after all, the middle of the night. Each thump of a wave, the physical shock not the sound, was echoed by the tinkling of the slowly melting ice in your glass.

It didn?t matter, really. She?d left, leaving a different kind of hole. One thing was for certain, that ship would never sail again.

Neither would this boat.

But this isn?t the right place to be working out those kinds of problems. Not as long as the boat was sitting like this, precariously perched on a few large rocks, a hole that was purely physical as if compensating for the emotional wreckage of the man.

The Man? that?d be you.

They say that Nero played the fiddle while Rome burned. Fiddles are cool. Rain isn?t. Rain is emotional. Always. Thunder and lightning, they?re just God?s adverbs.

He was using a lot of adverbs tonight.

It was safer in the physical wreck than out. You and your boat, one big Russian nested doll. Not sure if you?re the smallest piece or if there?s a smaller one hidden somewhere inside you. Maybe someone?ll have to try to crack you open and look.

You remember once watching a TV show that started with a woman?s voice claiming, ?This is the story of how I died.?

That always intrigued you.

This is the story of how you screwed up. Or maybe not. When you get to the end, you?ll re-read it and decide. Some of the details aren?t really clear at this point.

– – – –

Where should I start? Shall I tell you about the boat? It?s not mine.

Yeah, I stole it. But that?s OK. I?m not the person you think I am either. My name? I stole that, too. Maybe you should check your wallet: any pieces of ID missing? I?ll wait?
So someone stole the boat. He has my appearance but your name. Does that make him me? Can I be culpable for things done in your name? Probably. The law is a little anal.

Anyway, it was a nice boat, you really liked it.  That?s what I told anyone who asked.